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Appreciation 

WARREN PRESS 
Paul K. Blanchard 

DONOVAN & SULLIVAN 
P. Vcrrill Carter 

WINN STUDIO 

Richard G. Mahoney 
ADOLPH WAHL 




The 



1940 





£* 



NAUTILUS 






*-*&*?"' #yf 



Published In 
(he students of 

Eastern JVazarene l]u\lv»v 

Wollastim, Massachusetts 






st.y 



B 



ecause 



She has given generously of herself to E. X. C, ever 
loving, serving, aspiring; 

She will believe only the best about us, preferring to 
see only our merits and none of our failings; 

She has often fired our weakening resolves with her 
eagerness and enthusiasm; 

She is unflinchingly sincere, unflaggingly industrious, 
and unfailingly optimistic: 

We dedicate the 1!)M) volume of the Nautilus to 
Professor Edith F. Cove 




PROFESSOR EDITH F. COVE 



F 



orcwor 



d 



The jewelled days have hastened by — once more 
a year at E. N. ('. lias ended. Although we 
treasure each vivid, gleaming moment and seek 
to keep its recollection clear, time may cloud 
the image. May it be that in future days you 
shall find time to pause and recall memories, 
rich and fragrant, that you feared were gone — 
lost, lnit waiting for you here. 











Editor 

Business Manager 



Madeline Hiller 
George Laurie 



They turn their fans severely against the weather. 



Duil U contemplation of eternal interests. 



II ise. Firm, (untie, restraining hand. 



Deep-rooted faith . Mature outlook 



Steady beating of great hearts. 



High seriousness. Integrity. 



God-given strength. 



FAC 




ULTY 



BERTHA MDNRO, A.M. 

Dean of College 
English Literature 




C. R. WILLIAMSON, AH.. D.I). 

President 



STEPHEN S. WHITE, D.D.. l'h.l). 

Dean of Theoloyi/ 
Theology 




JAMES II. SHRADER, Ph.D. 
Chemistry 



FRED J. SHIELDS, A.M., Ed. M..DD. 

Education anil Psychology 



MARY HARRIS, A.M. 
French and Spanish 



COLLEGE 




LINFORD MARQUART, A.M. ROBERT J. DIXON, A.M., D.D. 
// istory I'h ilosoph >/ 



EDWARD S. MANN, A.M. 
Dean of Men, Mathematics 




\I,I< I. SPANGENBERG, A.M. RALPH EARLE, JR., H.l>., A.M. 
English Bible and Greek 



KENT GOODNOW, AM. 
Latin, Greek, and German 



COLLEGE 




HENRY II REEVES, KM. 
Burnar, Pnyrhology 



VERNER BABCOCK, \M. 
Biological Srit nc< a 



EDITH F. COVE, Mu- It 

I'm mi nml I In nrii 




AUDREY .1. WILLIAMSON, A.M. 

Speech and Orchestra 



ESTHER WILLIAMSON 

Dean of Women, Voice 



OLIVE B. MARPLE, A.B. 
Piano 



FACULTY 




MARCELLA AI.LS1IOI Sl'„ A.B. 

I'iaim 



MADELINE N. NT.ASK, A.B, DORIS GOODRICH, All., S.B. 
RcgLitrar Librarian 




EVANGELOS SOTERIADES, A.M. DONALD TILLOTSON, A.M. 
Principal of Academy Mathematics and Latin 

French and Chemistry 



MABEL M. EARLE, A.M. 
Bible 



ACADEMY 




\l.l< I. NIELSON, AH 
English 



ESTHER MILLS, \ B. 
History and Social S< 



Itt I II EDE, \.H 
keeping 





Unity is an essential to the life <>f our organi- 
zation, the Alumni Association of E. X. C. We 
have one common interest at heart — the pros- 
perity and growth of our Alma Mater. Our 
aim is to further her influence. 

At no time has the Association heen more 
active or aggressive than during the past year. 
In Cleveland, Pittsburg, New York, Erie, Boston, 
and Philadelphia, Alumni members met and or- 
ganized separate Regional Clubs, each carrying 
out the general plans of the whole organization. 

It has been suggested that the Constitution he 
revised so that all former students will he con- 
sidered associate members of the whole organi- 
zation, and that a questionnaire he sent to each 
member. Faithfully answered, the question- 
naire will aid the executives in proposing further 
activities for the Association. 

Last year the Alumni contributed over $4000 
toward the Debt Reduction Campaign. While 
this is being paid, the Permanent Endowment 
Fund, unreduced, continues as in the past. 

Our college needs the best Alumni Association 
she can possibly have. An active, responsible, 
well-ordered Alumni group means advertise- 
ment, financial aid, and inspiration. Since 
E. N. C.'s graduates are her best testimonies i 
achievement, the Alumni hold the key to the 
•est that E. \. C. may be in the future. 

Alice Nielson, Secretary 
Edward S. Mann, President 





Youth. Possibilities unrealized unfolding. 



Rerelation. ) oung nun seeing visions. 



[mbitions fired. Energies <hri<h</. 



Reaching toward responsibility. 



I ccom plishment beginning. 



Lift 's portals opening. 



I his is wisdoi 



i: l a 




SSES 




SENIORS 



Motto Esse quam videri. 
Colors: Dubonnet and blue. 



Presidt nt 






Robert Shofl 


1 'in - Presidt ni 






Timothy Marvin 


Secretary 






Avonelle Beall 


7 ' riiisuri r 






Grondall Foster 


St mil ill I 'ouncil 






Beulah Marvin 


Chaplain 






Prank Brickley 


Adviser 


P 


rofei 


>>or Spangenberg 



Seated, Spangenbet . Shoff.B. Marvin 
Standing. I. Marvin, Foster, F. Brickley 



Reflection 

Somehow we as seniors feel again thai anticipation, bewilderment, and excitement we felt 
when we ucrc freshmen. Four years ago we wire green u> a curriculum; now we are green to 
independent living. Four years ago we were wondering what field to major in; now we are per- 
plexed how to use our education. Four years ago we found our lit tic world helpful ami responsive; 
now we face a world neither friendly nor interested. 

Gone forever are Mich things as final exams, themes, term papers, hook reports, hours spent 
on a c,ri i ii Book or a .V until us, the excitement of Hush Day. the bustle of Campus Day, t he thrill 
< f Junior-Senior Day, the cheers over athletics, the funny dining room announcements, Friday 

night "per' and chapel talks. Yet some memories will always cling to us of the informal, chummy 

dormitory life, the sweet hours of friendship, the ennobling influence of our Christian professors, 
the sacredness of prayer iii our chapel. 

For the 111 on lent we are sad as we realize our college days are over. We realize we are begin- 
ning a life no longer carefree and narrowly margined; hut one that open- before us with broad 
horizon challenging our best thought. We have already spent our fresh springtime of life and 
before us lies the summer of maturity. 

\s we turn toward the unknown future, arc we afraid' \evcr! Because we ale not alone 

\^ we I urn toward a new and untried waj One ^1 1 j > ^ down beside us, takes our hand and dissolves 

all doubts as lie gently whispers, "This is the wax. walk ye in it." 

II. Crutcher 



20 




GRADUATES 



Allshi 



Avonelh Until 



WILLIAM CASPER ALLSHOUSE 

Binghamton, New York A.B. Philosophy 

Never loses his balance. Quiet composure. Finesse. 

Personality that blends like harmonious sounds. 

Make* influence felt trillion! a brass band. 

Reserved. Patient, ('anient. Tolerant. 

Sana as gentle as warm summer wind. 

Menial and spiritual poise. 

Com mantis res peel of all. 

Talks with God. 



AVONELLE JANE BEALL 
Conneaut, Ohio A.B. Biology 

Brings memories of flower gardens, silver bells, lilacs. 
Feminine. Suggests the soft tint of cream lace. 
The perfect secretary. Methodical. Poised. 
The efficient teacher. Calm. Thorough. 
Firm quality under quiet gentleness. 
I nassn mint/ — but discriminating. 
Demure. Dainty. Inner grace. 

Pastels. HI ashes. Smiles. 



FRANK MARION BRICKLEY 

Johnstown, Pennsylvania A.B. Theology 

Scrupulous. Earnest. Sonl yearns for spiritual values. 
Sterling character. Discriminating. Gentlemanly. 
Disciplined mind. Moral fibre. Awareness. 
No superfluity. Little liking for subterfuge. 
Shy. Mixture of feeling and of control. 
Cool depths of a mountain lake. 
Diligent and persevering. 
Sens') tire ( 'h ristia n . 



GEORGE WASHINGTON BRICKLEY 

Johnstown, Pennsylvania A.B. Theology 

Impression: Church usher and heel taps and quick stride. 
Jaunty. Anient. Gay dark eyes. An impish schoolboy. 
Innocuous, but persuasive. Drawl like Kay Kyser. 
"Choir boy." Baseball catcher. Good sport. 
Bustling. Blithe. Always busy. 

Solicitous. Salesman technique. 

Kinetic energy. Optimist. 
Brisk. Avidity for ideas. 



.,/.- Brickie 



George Brickley 



1940 




21 




GRAD1 IATES 






I rulch, 



I.I.MKK II A Kin ( OX 

Cleveland, Ohio A.I!. 

One thinks of troubadours and French lore songs. 

Air of disdain that inrades colleges. Reserre. 

Proud. Persistent. Startling conclusions. 

"Hoy's will is tin nun/'.* will." Restless. 

.1 Bohemian conception oj work. 

I. mil in inr peeling potatoes, 

Impregnablt in argument. 

Mercurial. I)i hbrrati . 



llistor\ . 



II \/l.l. 1 > VOXXE < Kl TCHER 

Wollaston, Massachusetts A.B. Rnglish Literature 

II istful. I. mi of the sun <iml wind and stars — and • 
Dreamy. Gentle. Serene. .1 port in tin storm. 
.1 steady confidante. A soft lingering smile. 
As much "J spirit as of flesh. M<>n 
Intlitin maiden. Minnehaha. 
Modest. Flittingly shy. 
Study in contrasts. 
■ of Christ. 



i.\ i : it ill <■ vtes i><>\\ N'lxo 

New <';i*tl<-. Pennsylvania \ -K. Theologj 

] <iml credulous us Don Quixote. Imperturbablt 

Ready smile. Resolute spirit. Culm of soul. 
Unruffled. Mild. Honest. Equable. 

■ all. Si use of duty. 
I- 1 in nt spi .; - ' ■■ rdy i>ianist. 

• rtnbli outlook mi lift . 
I a wa i 
faith 



GROXD VLL M WW 111. FOSTER 

Ashland, Kentucky All. History 

- fur tomorrow what can 6< ■/mi< tht 
Slim. Adroit. Km/ir. Hn,-,u. Sartorial example. 
Domiciles himself to enrironment easily. 
Southern chivalry. Chaucer's "Squyere." 

Little boy nt In art. 
Raton-twirler and clarinet expert. 

Xot n subtil limn in his six int. 
I'i ng-pong a ml !■ 









M> IO 




1940 




Evangt lini~ Garrison 



Lillian K,n,l„ll 



MIRTHA EVANGELINE GARRISON 

Rochester, New York A.B. Music 

Pianoforte Normal Certificate 

"Rachmaninoff's l'relttde." Stormy chords and storm// heart. 

Smiles anil scratches in a breath on the gym floor. 

Rebellious. Quickly generous. .Hire. Intense. 

Roguish. Impetuous. Delight in pranks. 

Copper// hair with lights and green cues. 

"Breath's a ware that will not keep." 

Oli, tlio.se exasperating studies. 1 

Sincere testimony. 



LILLIAN KATHRYN KENDALL 

Ashland, Kentucky A.B. English Literature 

Moods of a summer's day — as transitory, contrasting. 

Vivid. Imaginative. Eager to fire and to feel. 

"Little Lady Make-Believe." A romanticist. 

Eyes of the innocent — questioning, honest. 

Childishly trustful. Smilingly wilful. 

Giddy. Dramatic. Soulful. 

Student sobre saliente. 

Questing for an ideal. 



GEORGE CONRAD LAURIE 

Dover, New Jersey A.M. History 

Stern. Stoliil. Caution of one who mentally feels liis tea//. 
Frugal. Upright. Discerning. Sparing of speech. 

Dignity of a Hussion officer. Conscientious. 

Attentive to his own business. Determined. 
Definite aversions. Fine Christian. 
Slow starter. Strong finisher. 
Fearful football opponent. 

Thoroughbred. 



KARL GARFIELD LEE 

New Bedford, Massachusetts A.B. 

Black eyebrows that curve sharply. Fearless grey 

Inches enough to give him a health// domination. 

One thinks pf Apollo — Robin Hood — Viking. 

Decision. Honesty. Qualities of a leader. 

A stubborn look to his jaie. Character. 

Relishes life. "The Green Hornet." 

Captain of industry. Athlete. 

Purposeful Christian. 



Theology 

eyes. 



George I. u it r ie 



Eurl I., 




GRADUATES 



-'.< 




4. It AIM A I KS 



.1 <i n 



I., hi 



lit iihilt Mart, a 



.1 \ M is WARREN LEHMAN 

New Castle, Pennsylvania A. 15. 

Air of wanting to punch senseless people who make 

Bland. Casual. Untroubled. Hearty laugh. 

Clerer. "Conscientious objector to study. 

Can In uncomfortably scrutinizing. 

air virre." Professor Quiz. 
Guarded reticence on occasion. 
Amateur chef and sports fan. 
Cryptic. Quizzical. Neat. 



History 
up world. 



BEULAH BERNICE MARVIN 

Bradford, Pennsylvania \A\. History 

Feels ami in tin beauty of a poem, song, or promise. 

One Ihi nl.s of Cremona violins. "<>I<I Faithful." 

Simple creed of fulfil anil service ttnil Christ. 

Clear ring of crystal. (Inn-ions. Pensive. 
Sensitive to pleasure anil pain. Idealist. 
Trailer. Tense. Stifled uarmth. 

Sense of humor. Peact of soul. 
Like a steadily burning beacon. 



WILLARD TIMOTHY MARVIN 

Bradford, Pennsylvania A. 15. History 

Sometimes gets air of fixed absorption in some scent worry. 

s,il„ r. Credulous. Considerate. Realistic. Wry smile. 

Scowl of irritation at interruption of sleep. 

Distressingly mattt r-of-fact. Plausibli . 

Eyes mi far horizons. Scnsitivt hands. 

Lerel. Casual. Inscrutable waiter. 

Cirih physique. Life-guard. 

I) mil humor. Detachment. 



HAROLD SNYDER MILLS 
Ashtabula, Ohio A.M. 

Smouldering fires. One thinks of ginger. Mettlt 
Hare betrayal of feelings. Uncompromising. 
Self-su pporting. Thrift;/. Money- maker. 
No vapid agreement. Tacit. Rugged. 
Bridled reactions. Pithy. Fastidious. 
Explosive, heart// laughter, 
Progn ssive. Futuristic. 
Adamant . Practical. 



Theology 
Spicy. 



Timothy Mat 



ll„r,,l.l \l,lt.< 



MM O 




1940 




Oaynelle Persons 



Vera Priestly 



GAYNELLE MAY PERSONS 

Erie, Pennsylvania A.B. English Literature 

Compressed. Pent-lip. One thinks of candles hades. 

Direct green-grey eyes under straight black lashes. 

Aloof. Carries nose with appearance of "sniff." 

Lores swell of hymns, Beethoven, echo of hells. 

Interest in htinds and motives. Deft. 

Formidable will. Strength. 

Faith after self-search. 
Yearning for Cod. 



VERA MAE PRIESTLY 

Kendall, New York A. 15. History 

Humor irhiclt won't he destroyed even under com pulsion. 

Tireless worker. Dependable. Sympathetic. 

Lightness of Tilania and fairies in her song. 

Gold in her hair. Laughter on her lips. 

Outbursts. Gestures. Cheerful heart. 

Impression: fluttering butterflies. 

Incessant, merry chatter. 

Sincere Christian. 



MILDRED EDNA SCHERNECK 

St. Petersburg, Florida A.B. Music 

Diminutive. Grace, shy smile. Clear, innocent brown eyes. 
Agitated. Like a caged wood-pigeon ready for flight. 
Timidity of shrinking violets. Concentrated life. 
Sturdy. Diligent. Respectful. Blushing. 
Pianist. Clarinet player. 'Typist. 
Often teased. Never cross. 
Faithful. Well-liked. 
Ounce of sweet. 



ROBERT JOHN SIIOFF 

Warren, Ohio A.B. Theology 

Sports devotee. High-point num. Versatile athlete. 
Tom Sawyer grown up. Scrubbed-looking schoolboy. 

Ulind self-fury. A quickly generous smile. 
Disarming artlessness of the Middle West. 
Fleet as Mercury with his winged shoes. 
'Transparency. Felicity. Alacrity. 
Natural. Product of the outdoors. 
Fun-loving, likable redhead. 



Mihlmt Scke 



Robert Shojf 




GRADUATES 



25 




JUNIORS 



Color*: Royal blue and while. 

I'n rident 
Vice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 

Program Chairman 

Student Council 

Chaplain 

. Idriser 



Floyd Sin i t li 

Madeline Miller 

Betty Kauffman 

Karl Scotl 

Leslie Strathern 

Lester Jones 

Lawrence Walker 

Professor Shrader 



Walker, Shrader, F. Smith, Hitler 
Standing: I.. Jones, I:. Kauffman, >n.ii. Strathern 



Southern Vignette 



Mt. Dora, hidden away in the heart (if the Florida citrus fruit Kelt- most truly Southern 
town of all the state. Off the main highways, the yearly inundation of tourists passes it by and 
haves it dreaming in an atmosphere of peace. 

Once each year Mt. Dora comes awake and something almost like excitement pervades her 
wide, old-fashioned streets. When the yearly fruit harvest is ready for picking, the packers and 
trucker> move in. The streets are decorated, and for perhaps a week the village will entertain 
her neighbors at the annual Orange Festival. But soon the last guest has departed, the last 

crate is shipped, ami the town goes In sleep for another year. 

Mt. Dora — lost in acres of trees. Glossy orange and grapefruit trees ranged in regular 
rnu- as evenly spaced as a troop of soldiers. Pine green sod smOOthshaven as a lawn. Borders 
of Hide-spreading oak trees draped uith streamers of Spanish moss. 

The large harvest moon diffuses its soft radiance aboul us ,1. we lirst approach Mt. Dora. 
Bach tree etched in hold relief; each swaying tendril of silvery gray moss the garment of some 
tinea rl My w rail h hilling in t he shadow s. The t iny lake flecked with gold and shadow a in an ever- 
changing pattern of light and darkness. A faint, mysterious scent rising from the cups of 
Southern blossoms. Enchantment. 

In daylight like a page from Mark Twain. Southern mansions with stately pillars and 
shuttered windows one almost expects to see lorn Sawyer walking along the while picket 
fences around I he well-kept yards. 

Mt. Dora charming, gracious, and altogether lovely. 

I. Jones 



28 




HI II 



Berj Bcrberi 



Wcuhy liro 



Or,,l,„ Cat 



BERJ BERBERIAN 

Kessali, Syria 

Cosmopolitan . . . quick observation . . . fluent 
linguist . . . nimble-witted . . . no sooner said than done 
. . . verve 



DOROTHY CHESBROUGH 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts 

Quietly cheerful . . . companionable . . . crisp and 
orderly . . . understanding . . . industrious . . . merry 
eyes . . . expressive face . . . cooperative. 



WESLEY BROWN 

Meadville, Pennsylvania 

Unostentatious . . . imperturbable . . . dogged 
judicious . . . gruff . . . L. E. S. leader . . . dependable. 



FRANK COMRIE 

Mystic, ( 'onnecticul 

Alert silence . . . unmistakable opinions . . . prone 
to dogmatize . . . things are either black or white . . . 
debauchee in study . . . genius for details. 



ORIMIA (ASF 

Bellevue, Michigan 

Genuine sincerity . . . circumspect . . . guileless look 
. . . mellow spirit . . . serenity . . . preoccupied . . . probing 
expression. 



KLINE DICKERSON 

Indianapolis, I m liana 

Appealing drawl . . . whimsical . . . capricious sense 
of humor . . . debonair . . . unconcerned . . . fine sense of 
loyalty. 



Dorothy Chesbrough 



Frank Comrit 



Kim, Dicker 



1941 




29 




Ml I I 



Douglat Fisk 



Hazt I Fralt <i 



V i rnon II ■ 



DOUGLAS I ISK 

Edgew ood, Rhode Island 

Smile lurking in the corner <>f his mouth . . . teasing 
"Yankee" t u n n^r . , . flaming red hair thai belies his 
pacific nature . . . buoyant . . . quartet tenor with a torrid 
I. lush. 



EARL HEINLEIN 

Washington, Pennsylvania 

Fastidious tastes . . . mobility . . . basketball enthu- 
siast . . . earnest . . . sleek . . . responsive . . . Cavalier 



HAZEL FRALE"J 

Mew Castle, Pennsylvania 

Firm as a fortress . . . diligent . . . unvarnished sin- 
cerity . . . generous, friendly ways . . . sweetly diplomatic 
monitor . . . mingles freely and easily. 



MADELINE HILLER 
Paw tucket, Rhode Island 

Idealism and prosaic good sense . unexpected 

tire . . . sage remark- . . . undecided whether to have ob- 
jective interest in the »<>rh! or to be young and foolish 
. . . staunchness. 



VERNON HEFFERN 
Oil City, Pennsylvania 

Mathematical inclination . . . boyishly ingenuous . . . 
mat . . . pleasantly courteous . . . quietly tantalizing 
humor . . . Salvation Army tambourines. 



BETTY K \I I 'I'M \\ 

West Hartford, Connecticut 

Pride . . . tasteful simplicity . . . self-conscious aware- 
ness . . . patrician dignity . . . sun-kissed hair . . . sensi- 
tivity that appears like dart- . . . piquant. 



Earl ll< inlt "i 



Madelim II 



; . h 



in ii 




JO 



1941 




Helen Kinsey 



Albert Kirkland 



J ah n Nielson 



HELEN KINSEY 

East Liverpool, Ohio 

S.-cs light instead <>f frustration . . . fine apprecia- 
tion . . . modest . . . reserved . . . fanciful . . . cloistral . . . 
pensive . . . thoughtful of others . . . steady glow. 



ELLEN RITTENBERG 

Groveland, Massachuset I s 

Look of a good child . . . fragility of waxen petals . . . 
sweet . . . serious intelligence . . . gentle character . . .in- 
tent . . . limpid pool . . . unplumlied depths. 



ALBERT KIRKLAND 

Springfield, Massachusei Is 

Faintly inquisitive grin . . . serious deliberation 
laconic . . . the Kirkland individuality . . . bashful 
deep, low voice ... a certain bewildering insight. 



EARL SCOTT 

Miami, Florida 

Athletic . . . fans flames of discontent . 
convictions . . . quicksilver moods . . . restive . 
. . . fierce loyalties. 



. militant 
. mimicry 



JOHN NIELSON 

Lowell, Massachusetts 

Square cleft chin . . . candor . . . 'cellist . . . streaks 
of fun . . . sanguine . . . systematic thinker ... of an un- 
compromising cut . . . sincere. 



FLO VI) SMITH 

Winter I'ark, Florida 

Obdurate will . . . s ewhat phlegmatic exterior . . . 

fond of joking and leasing . . . punster . . . tender con- 
science . . . easy-going. 



I'JIm l!,u, nbera 



Earl Scott 



I loyd S m ■ th 




1041 



31 




U> I I 



s 



Harold ' 



LESLIE STRATHERN 
Bayonne, New Jersey 

Blithesome Scotch laddie . . . mind like ;t searchlight 
. . . silver talk . . . exhilaration . . . keen. bright eyes . . . 
song tender, joyous, lively . . . '"over the teacup." 



LAWRENCE WALKER 
\. u Philadelphia, Ohio 

Dynamic . . . loquacious . . 
quence and imaginative flashes . 
. . . needle-witted. 



. dizzy heights of elo- 
. . steady and sensible 



»lniiiors--mi pictures 

HOWARD ANDREE 

Monongahela, Pennsylvania 

Fighting presence . . . no retractions . . . intimidating 
monitor . . . individuality . . . proficient Jack-of-all- 
trades . . . wary . . . grim humor thai sometimes mocks. 



HAROLD WELLER 
Low ville, New York 

Rip Van Winkle in the classroom . . . mechanic . . 
honest and frank . . . "cool ;i» the <lrip of fresh water". . 
hearty liluffne*- . . . hail-fellow-well-met. 



THELMA DAISY 
Prankford, Delaware 

Quaker maid . . . sudden, shy -mile . . . pent-up sup- 
pression . . . silenl ;i^ nigh I . . . thorough . . . chasmed 
depl hs. 



LESTER JONES 

Miami. Florida 

Succinl . . . salty «il . . . even tenor . . . philosophical 
. . . unsparing demands of self . . . appraising . . . daring. 

SHIRO KANO 
k\ nin, Japan 

(overt watchfulness . . . untutored reactions . . . 
Oriental stolidity . . . acrid humor . . . courtesy thai 
shames American breesiness. 



I WII.S ST I MM 
( tsgoode, < Mitario 

Curiously speculative glance . astute . manly 
. . self-confidenl . . . mental keenness . . . facile sermon- 
i/rr . . Canadian hockej player. 



12 



SOPHOMORES 




Seated: Gould, Dixon, Sweigeri 
Standing: Rcslrick, Douglas 



FRESHMEN 



Color*: GreeD and gold. 

President 
Vice- President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Student Council 
Program Chairman 
< 'haplain 
.\<l riser 



Paul Kirkland 

Robert Nielson 

Nick Yosl 

Pert Greer 

Tondra Border 

Carl Hanks 

Oscar Stockwell 

Professor Mar quart 



Oolors: Pale green and yellow. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Student Council 
Chaplain 

Ad riser 



Josephine Sweigeri 

George Douglas 

Winnifred Gould 

William Restrick 

George Dixon 

Professor Maim 




Seated: 0. Stockwell, I'. Kirkland, R. Vielson 
Standing: Greer, Vost, Hortler 



33 




I*» 12 



C iroiine h.lrllrll 



Willi im Benson 



I) mold BrickUy 



Douglas 



Caroline Bartlett 
London, Ontario 



Rachel Emery 
Warren, Pa. 



William Benson 
Wollaston, Mass, 



Ruth Friend 
Acosta, Pa. 



Donald Brickley 
Jobnstown, Pa. 



Winnifred Gould 
Bast < Cleveland, Ohio 



George Douglas 
Johnson City, N. V*. 



Ahbie-Jean Kauffman 
Wesl Hartford, Conn. 



Kiit In I 1 met i 



Kuth I 



II i il in '; 






l«» 12 




\4 



1942 




Ruth Kinsey Harold Parsons Arthur Paynt Muriel Payne 



Ruth Kinsey 

K;ist Liverpool. Ohio 



Allan Pfautz 
Akron, Ohio 



Harold Parsons 
Melrose, Mass. 



Lee Powell 
Canfield, Ohio 



Arthur Payne 
Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 



William Restrick 
Collingswood, N. J. 



Muriel Payne 
Kenmore, N. V. 



Rose Marie Salvia 
Johnstown, I'm. 



Allan l'Jautz Lee Powell William Restrick Rose Marie Salvia 




1942 



35 




Beatria Savage 



Anna Mary Shoff 



J ran Shrader 



IIII2 



Josephine Sweigeri 



Beatrice Savage 
Peabody, Mass. 



Mae Thompson 
Manchester, Conn. 



Anna Mary Shoff 
Warren, Oliio 



Franklyn Wise 
< lortland, Ohio 



Jean Shrader 

Wollaston, Mass. 



Arnold Woodcook 

I nion, New York 



Josephine Sweigert 
Cressona, l'a. 



Jerry Woodcook 
Elmira, New York 



M 



1-ranklyn II nr 



.;, i»>k 



Jen y II* 



IIII2 




.'<, 



194S 




Rulh Adsit 
Tondra Border 



Arpod Artwohl 
Rulh Boyd 



Robert Blaugha 
Lyal < 'alhoun 



Adelaide Blauveli 
Dena \ 'aughn ( 'lemens 



Delia Boggs 
( 'arolyn ( 'olt ord 



Ruth Adsit 
Syracuse, X. Y. 

Arpod Artwohl 
Allentown, Pa. 

Robert Blaugher 

Terrace, l'a. 

Adelaide Blauvelt 
Beacon, X. V. 

Delia Boggs 
Bel Air, Maryland 



Tondra Border 
Cleveland, Ohio 

Ruth Boyd 
Erie, Pa. 

Lyal Calhoun 
Lineboro, Maryland 

Dena Vaughn Clemens 
Xortonville, X. I). 

Carolyn Colcord 
Upton, Mass. 



William Cole 
Hampton, X. J. 

Robert Crays 

Lake view, Oregon 

Catherine DeCassio 

Springfield, Mass. 

Paul Eby 

Miami, Florida 

Edward Edwards 

Melrose, Mass. 



Isabelle Gardner 
Binghampton, X. Y. 

Virginia Graffam 
Haverhill, Mass. 

Bertram Greer 

Akron, Ohio 

Gwendola Haines 

Hawthorne, l'a. 

Carl Hanks 

East Liverpool, ( >hio 



William Cole 
Isabelle Gardner 



Robert Crays 
Virginia Graffam 



( 'alherine Dei 'assio 
Berlrand Greer 



I'aul i'.by 
Gwendola Haines 



Edward Edwards 

Carl Hanks 




i»4:i 



37 




IJM.-I 



Ruth Hardy Richard Howard 


Irving Jones 


Vivian Jonei Gladuyn Karker 




"aid Ku ! Merrill Lidd 


AgMS /.<l[>[>in 


1 n>u l.xlf 


Winifred Maddux 




Ruth Hardy 


Paul Kirkland 




George Marple 


Goldie Mills 


Wilmington, N. Y, 


Springfield, M;i-~. 




Wheeling, W. Va. 


Kingsville, Ohio 


Richard Howard 


Merrill Ladd 




Beulah Martin 


Jessie McCullough 


Minion, Ohio 


Swanton, Vt. 




Stoneham, Muss. 


New Philadelphia, Ohi 


Irving Jones 


Agnes Lappin 




Cedric Martin 


Laura McKinney 


Lewiston, Maine 


Bellaire, Ohio 




Richford, Vt. 


Wesl Chazy, N. V. 


Vivian Jones 


Anne Lyle 




Helen Marvin 


Robert Nielson 


Hyde Park, Vt. 


Warren, Pa. 




Wollaston, Mass. 


Lowell, Mass. 


Gladwyn Karker 


Winifred Maddox 




Alfred Mason 


John Parry 


Wollaston, M;i>>. 


( lambridge, Ohio 




Waynesburg, Pa. 


Bethlehem, Pa. 



I ! ► I :i 



Cearge Marple 
C.oldit MiUl 



Beulah Martin 
Jessii Mel uliough 



Cedrii Martin 
Laura M< Kinnei 



llflt-n Marvin 
Ktthtrl Vielson 



Mirfd .U,i><>>/ 

John Parry 




.18 



1943 




Doris Pearsall 
Allen Richardson 



Kenneth Pearsall Paul Peffer Phyllis Reynolds 

Kenneth Robinson Katkleeen Sanderson Frederick Savage 



George Rite 
Ruth Schlosser 



Doris Pearsall 
Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Kenneth Pearsall 
Lynbrook, X. Y. 

Paul Peffer 

Wellsville, Ohio 

Phyllis Reynolds 

Erie, Pa. 

George Rice 
Franklin, Pa. 



Allen Richardson 
Pawtucket, R. I. 

Kenneth Robinson 

Grove City, Pa. 

Kathleen Sanderson 
Jackman, Maine 

Frederick Savage 
Peabody, Mass. 

Ruth Schlosser 
.Hawthorne, Pa. 



Robert Shaffer 
Pottstown, Pa. 

Ruth Shirton 

Wollaston, Mass. 

Dorris Shoemaker 
Hammond, X. Y. 

Dorothy Simonson 
Fast Rockaway, X. Y. 

Ernest Smith 

Benton, Maine 



John W. Smith 
Woodhaven, X. Y. 

Rachel Stockwell 

Gardner, Mass. 

Helen Strait 

Akron, Ohio 

Kenneth Sullivan 

Haveloek, Xova Scotia 

Robert Timm 

Cleveland, Ohio 



Robert Shaffer 
John W. Smith 



Ruth Shirton 
Rachel Stockwell 



Dorris Shoemaker 
Helen Strait 



Dorothy Simonson 
Kenneth Sullivan 



Ernest Smith 
Robert Timm 




194 a 



M) 




Phyllis Tra Margery Twining lliirry Weikel Clifford Weller Sprmtr Welter 

Marjorii Whispel Curtice White Garnet Wood Betty Zimmerman 



i»-i:t 



Phyllis Traverse 
Braintree, Mass. 

Margery Twining 

I nion, New York 

Harry Weikel 
Norristown, Pa. 

Clifford Weller 
Lowville, X. ^ '.. 

Spencer Weller 
Lowville, N. V. 



Marjorie Whispel 
Springfield, Mass. 

Curtice White 
Johnsville, Pa. 

Garnet Wood 
Easl Liverpool, Ohio 

Betty Zimmerman 
. MilBinburg, Pa. 



Sophomores — no |»i (-lures 



Samuel Cole 
Wollaston, Mass. 

George Dixon 
Jackman, Maine 

Paul Hetrick 
Easl Butler, Pa. 

Florence Jenkinson 
North Chelmsford, Mass. 

Mar> June Ki'ffer 
I >over, < Ihio 



Wilbur Mullen 
Hartland, New Brunswick 

Charlie Plaskett 
Toronto, ( Intario 

VeSJ Stemm 
Wollaston, Mass. 

George Wolf 
Wollaston, Mass. 

John Young 
Johnson, N i 



l.i 



Freshmen -- no pictures 



Douglass Acton 
Mannington, \V. Va. 

Charles Akers 

Akron, Ohio 

Rudy Anderson 
New Haven, Conn. 

Jane Louise Barker 
Wooster, Ohio 

Willard Bartol 

Montclair, Mass. 

Helen Cassidy 
Endicott, X. Y. 

Wendall Comrie 

Mystic, < unii. 

Esther Crossley 
Deny Village, N. II. 

Agnes Cubic 
Saugus, Mass. 



Alexander Cubie 
Saugus, Mass. 

Boyd Davis 
Cumberland, M<l. 

Jessie Duty 
New Martinsville, W. Va. 

Dale DuVall 

( 'anfield, Ohio 

John Fair 
Kreamer, Pa. 

Maxine Fawcett 

New Philadelphia, Ohio 

Norma Gelineau 

Webster, Mass. 

Theodore Georgian 

Dorchester, Mass. 



Viola Hall 

Boston, Mass. 

Paul Horton 
Pawtucket, It. I. 

Weston Jones 

Lewiston, Maine 

Elizabeth Koehler 

Penns Grove, N. J. 

Warren Mingledorff 

Toronto, Ohio 

John Murray 
New Eagle, Pa. 

Mae McGuire 

Toronto, Ontario 

Vera Ridgway 

Toronto, Ontario 



Edwin Ryan 

Brockton, Mass. 

Roland Stanford 
Midgell, P. E. I. 

Barbara Stetson 

South Portland, Maine 

Oscar Stockwell 
Gardner, Mass. 

Alexander Wachtel 

Kingston, N. Y. 

Lois Wright 

South Portland, Maine 

Rachel Yerxa 

Portland, Maine 

Nick Yost 
Centerville, Pa. 



Fireplace Fishing' 



The flames leap and curl around the hickory log that disturbs the charred, sparkling remains 
in the fireplace. I watch the smoke, like white nymphs, ascend the black throat of the chimney. 

Instantly I am off, wading knee-deep in my favorite pool. Twigs and broken branches jam 
continuously against the fallen birch, wedged between two boulders on the bank. 

An ideal spot, this, for my prize trout. The blue and yellow fly that I cast far out, the 
hesitating and Iwisting current carries down to the calm water by the log. I retrieve the slack 
in my silk line. Comes the strike as I expected, straight up from the bottom of the current. The 
sudden impulse in the rod assures me. The hook is imbedded in my opponent's mouth. Twice 
the silver streak leaps high into the air, but the rod holds to the last second. Then the van- 
quished rainbow surrenders, protesting to the end. 

I look up at the clock on the mantle. Forty minutes to catch that fish. Well, I have been 
dreaming. Getting up from my chair, I put another log on the fire. That blue and yellow fly — 
wouldn't some big-mouthed bass snap at such a bait! My heavy steel could hold a record bass. 

The sudden crackling of the green hickory in the fireplace interrupts my musing. 

Twelve-thirty. I bank the fire carefully, and watch the sparks, like dust particles in a ray 
of sun, go shooting up the chimney. 

"That was good fishing," I whisper. 

—J. W. Smith 



ACADEMY 




Vesntilh, flossier, Kcehler, Morgan, S. White, \ 
/>. /;. wen. Mills, Tillotson, Hawk, 5 Vielson.E, B 

ir, Tripp, Thomas, Kilgour 
Irdrey, Larson, Evans, Stumpf, Harvey, Booth, D 



OFFICERS 

President Richard Hawk Vice-President Blaine Bowen Secretary Eva H<«>tli 



Richard Hawk 



GRADUATES 
Blaine Bmwvii 



Eleanor Morgan 



4.' 



Professor and student shoulder to shoulder. 
. Ipplication. Participation. Practice. 

Action college out of the classroom . 

Outings, parties, programs. 

Focus for enthusiasms. 
Qualities aesthetic. 
Relaxation. 



ACTIV 




ITIES 



Stiifleni Council 



jfljfg 


A ^fl | - 


9 ' ® 


r/ -1 ft ' ■ iTl^^Br 




1 i^-TTfsSp if Ml 






It Marvin, Beall, Lee, Earlt 

Border, Alhhoute, Reitrick, Jonei, Larson, Lehman 



To the Student Council falls the lot of 
weighing and sifting the random ideas and 
proposals of the students, and of present- 
ing the worthwhile propositions lor faculty 
approval. 

This year rules for freshman initiation 
were the object of a faculty revision which 
was ratifieil by the Council. Through the 
efforts of the Student Council and the 
faculty, the hour for chapel was changed 
from noon to mid-morning, an hour more 
advantageous to the working students. 

The Council also initiated a move for 
election reform, which the faculty ap- 
proved. By the new system, each nominee 
for the offices of Student Council president 
and vice-president. Nautilus editor and 
business manager, and Campus Camera 
editor and business manager, must have a 
sponsor, who shall present nominating 



papers signed by twenty-five students to 
enter the candidate in the primary elec- 
tion. For each office, the two candidates 
who receive the highest number of votes 
in the "primaries" are entered in the final 
election, which is run off in voting booths 
in the library on an appointed day. 

The Council, with the faculty, arranges 
for the Friday evening programs. Rush 
Day. Campus Day. Junior-Senior Day, 
and the annual school outing. In coopera- 
tion with the three Greek letter societies 
the Council launched an enthusiastic 
"Student Get Student" campaign. 

I' resident Farl Fee 

Vice-President Avonelle Beall 

Secretary Beulah Marvin 

Program Chairman William Allshouse 

. Idriser Professor Farle 



to 



Honor Society 



The Honor Society was organized several 
years ago to stimulate interest in the 
highest standards of scholarship. Its mem- 
bers are elected each Commencement for 
the following year on the basis of their 
scholastic standing : at least a B+ average, 
with no grade below B-. 

Naturally, one of the Society's main 
interests is the library. Every year the 
<iroup follows the custom of raising money 
to be used for subscriptions to some of the 
leading magazines. 

The society's annual program was pre- 
sented February 9. Three educational 
films were shown, and several selections 
on the vibraharp and 'cello were played 
by Rachel Emery and John Nielson. 



A notable contribution of the Honor So- 
ciety is the sixty-dollar scholarship, awarded 
at Commencement on the basis of scholar- 
ship, character, and contribution to E. X. ('. 

The high rating of scholarship that 
E. N. ('. has attained is certainly due in 
great part to the efforts made by the 
Honor Society to keep the standards high 
and to recognize those whose scholarship 
deserves commendation. 



Chairman 

V ice-Chairman 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Hazel Crutcher 

Rachel Emery 

Helen Kinsey 

Elizabeth Corbett 

Corresponding Secretary Marjorie Whispel 

Program Chairman Virginia (Iraffam 




(iraffam, Kendall, II. Kinsey, Emery, Crutcher, Si. Payne, II. Marvin, Hitler, 
II kispel, It. Kinsey, ■/. Nielson, Comric, Sullivan, Kano, Zimmerman, Knuffn 



47 



Psvfhologv Club 



mmn 11 






i! i* 


iff* $, f : 


■■J i 

III' • 


P jS?"? 4*^ tSi tf*- * 



Rettriclc, Seherneek, i. Payne, .1. Shoff, A. Kirkland, Fn.hr. Cox, Ski 
Gelineau, Strait, It. Shoff, Hull. I.. Jones, Shields, Reeves, Heinlein, Garrison, Edwards, Salvia, Pars 



Slr.it/tt rtt 



The Psychology Club was organized for 

those who have a definite interest in psy- 
chology or who are majoring in that field. 
It opened its year's activities with an ini- 
tiation party for all new members. 

Since that time, the club has been grow- 
ing in zest and enthusiasm. The advisers. 
Professors Fred J. Shields and Henry 11. 
Reeves, and the officers aided in making 

the Psychology Club a success by their 
active and personal interest. 

The Psychology Club has kept an en- 
thusiastic note of progress in its varied 
interests. The members received educa- 
tional and enlightening experience from a 
visil to the Waverly Institute for the 
Feeble-Minded ; an illustrated lecture on 
hypnotism by Professor Shields; an action 
picture, "Conflicting Situations of Child- 
hood,' - which pertained to t lit* experi- 
mental and clinical techniques of Kurt 
l.ewin in the study of behavior; a descrip- 



tion of the Revised Stanford-Binet Scale; 

and an interesting field trip to Perkins In- 
stitution and Massachusetts School for the 
Blind which climaxed the year of 1 !>.'?!) -40. 

An entertaining educational program 
under the direction of Professor Shields 
was presented on April 12. This program 
was sponsored by lxith the Education and 
Psychology Clubs and featured tests of the 
mental and motor abilities of children one 
to five years old. 

With the good foundation for success 
built last year and the growing enthu- 
siasm and interest discernible this year, 
the Psychology Club sees progress ahead 
in the future. 



President 

I "ict-l'n siilciil 

Secretary 
Treasurt r 
Program ( 'hiarman 



Albert Kirkland 

Anna Mary Shoff 

Edith Fader 

Karl Scott 
Helen Strait 



is 



Education Club 



The Education Club might easily be 
considered the twin-sister of the Psycholo- 
gy Cluli. Supervised by the same adviser. 
Professor Fred W. Shields, the two organ- 
izations have worked, held meetings, and 
made trips together through the year. 

In September activities were begun with 
a party at the home of Professor Shields. 
Meetings during the year featured talks 
on various aspects of education. Eula 
Wright spoke on teaching in Quincy 
Schools; Agnes Cubie gave a talk on the 
English school system; and Elizabeth Cor- 
hett gave a demonstration of the use of 
mental tests for children from one to three 
years of age. 

The high point of the year was the pro- 
gram, given in collaboration with the 
Psychology Club on April 12. It was 
presented in the form of a psycho-educa- 



tional clinic, for the purpose of showing 
the progress of children from one to five 
in adaptive behavior an 1 in motor, lan- 
guage, and social development. 

The two clubs presented to the Depart- 
ment of Psychology and Education a 
color-mixer, an expensive piece of equip- 
ment that will be very useful in laboratory 
work. 

The club climaxed its activities with a 
banquet in May. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Program Chairman 

Chaplain 

Adviser 



Beatrice Savage 

Vernon Heffern 

Ruth Kinsey 

Maxine Fawcett 

Vera Priestly 

Harold Welle r 

Professor Shields 




I ubie.S. Weller, M. Keffer, Priestly, Shields, Heffern, Beall 

It. Savage, Akere, Fawcctl, Zimmerman, Friend, li. Kinsey, Jenkins 



Mc Kinney, Lehman, II. Mo 



V) 



MiiKii* riiib 




V. Jones, B. Bowen, Kallg/en, Maddox, Garrison, E. Williamson, Cove, 1. Williamscn, R.Stockwell, 1. Shi 

erneck. Salvia, \1. Payne, Clemens, \I. Kinney, Priestly, Friend, Wood, E. Bowen, D.Brickley, Shaffei 
Berberian, Yosl, Downing, Pejfer, Foster, Border 



Although a comparatively new organi- 
zation on the campus of E. N. ('.. the 
Music Club lias not allowed itself to lag in 
accomplishment. Its l!),'5i) U) program has 
included features of benefit nol only to 
members but to the entire school. 

In October the Music Club sponsored 
one of the regular Friday night programs, 
presenting Miss Artiss l)e Volt, well- 
known harpist. The club lias also pro- 
moted the redecorating of music practice 
rooms in the Canterbury. The college 
has taken care of the painting and papering: 
the Music Club has added curtains and 
other finishing touches to make the rooms 
more cozy and inspirational. 

Programs for the regular monthly meet- 
ings have provided a variety of musical 
material. Ilighdight of the October meet- 
ing was an original reading by Mrs. G. H. 
Williamson describing a mother's reaction 
lo Professor Cove's leaching. In January 



the club celebrated the arrival of 1940 with 
a discussion of "Firsts in Music.'' illustrated 
by Mrs. Esther Williamson's singing of 
the "Erlking." February brought a Mo- 
zart program, with a review of Mozart's 
life and a comparison of the modern num- 
ber "Eighteenth Century Drawing Room" 
with the Mozart "Sonata in ( ' Major'' from 
which it was taken. 

Because of the large number interested 
in the organization, the Music Club has, 
in addition to the twenty-five active mem- 
bers, twenty-six associate and honorary 
members. 

President Evangeline Garrison 

Vice-President Helen Kinsey 

Secretary Mildred Scherneck 

Treasurer Everett Downing 

Program Head Muriel Payne 

Adrisers Mrs. G. H. Williamson 

Mrs. F. Williamson 

Professor ( !ove 



50 



Literary dub 



The Literary Club, under the- leadership 
of Gaynelle Persons, has had an interesting 

and educational yi"u\ ()i ir purpose has 
been to promote enjoyable activity for 
those who are interested in the best in 
literature, and to keep abreast of the times 
in our study of current masterpieces. 

During the first semester our regular 
meetings were devoted largely to discus- 
sion of well-known works of contemporary 
authors. The writings of Robert P. Tris- 
tram Coffin were read as a background for 
the literary highlight of the year. On 
December 1, Mr. Coffin, Pulitzer Prize 
winner and author of the best-seller Ken- 
nebec, appeared in the college chapel in a 
Friday night program of delightful "Talk 
and Headings." 

A series of round-table discussions on 
social problems was held during the second 
semester. The contributions of literature 
to the topics of war, the labor problem, the 



immigrant, and the problems of the South, 
were discussed with a view to understand- 
ing better the social conditions of our 
nation. 

In addition to their regular meetings 
members of the society paid visits to the 
Boston Book Fair and the Isabella Stewart 
Gardiner Museum, and attended various 
lectures in and about Boston by prominent 
literary figures, including Carl Sandburg, 
the Lincoln biographer. 

The club has given books to the college 
library. It has also conducted one chapel 
service, at which Hazel Crutcher read 
Henry Van Dyke's The Lost Word and Vir- 
ginia Graffam sang "I Know A Name." 



President 
Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Adviser 



( I-aynelle Persons 
Virginia Graffam 
Betty Kauffman 
Winnifred Gould 
Professor Munro 




Spangenberg, B. Kauffman, Persona, .1. Kauffman, Emery, Munro, Zimmerman, J '. Mils 
Shrader, II. Marvin, Graffam, Gould, Karker, Goodrich, It. all, Kendall, ( rutckcr, Calhoun 



Hillt 



I . iVt\ />"" 



51 



Science Chili 




Heffern,L. Jones, Georgian, Wise, Tillotson, //<•' lineau, .1. K.auffman,G. 

Colcord, J. Young, Rice, Scott, Eby, S. Welter, Edwards, Powell, Fisk, Dr. Shrader, Karker 



Under the direction <>f the Chairman of 
the Science Division. Dr. Shrader, and 
In- associates, Professors Mann and Bab- 
cock, the Science and Mathematics Club 
was organized in the middle of the first 
semester. In order to give each student 
the opportunity to work in the particular 
field of science most interesting to him, the 
Club was divided into three groups i 1 I the 
Mathematics group, (2) the Chemistry 
group, and (3) the Medical group. At the 
beginning of the second semester all the 
members interested in photography began 
a study of photography and are outfitting 
a dark room for developing pictures. 

The Club has taken upon itself the con- 
struction and acquiring of additional equip- 
ment for the various laboratories and class- 
rooms. A spherical blackboard has been 



built for the math department and several 
models have been made for the biology 

department. 

The climax of the year's activities was 
the presentation of the Science Club pro- 
gram Friday evening. March '20. The 
program was designed to show how much 
and in what ways science has developed 
since the early alchemists first tried to 
transmute base metals into pure gold. An 
early alchemist's shop was contrasted with 
a modern laboratory and differences in 
technique were pointed out. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 
Program Iletnl 



John Young 

Vernon Heffern 

Abbie-Jean Kauffman 

Pranklvn Wise 

Prankiyn Wise 



Historical Society 



Under the leadership of its faculty ad- 
viser and founder, Professor Linford A. 
Marquart, the Historical Society has main- 
tained throughout the year an active pro- 
gram devoted to historic interests and 
current affairs. 

During the second semester the society 
compiled into permanent form a history 
of E. N. C, which was presented at Com- 
mencement and designated to he preserved 
in the school library. 

On December 1.5, 1 !)■'}!), the Society pre- 
sented James II. Powers, foreign corre- 
spondent of a Boston newspaper, who 
spoke on "The Twenty-fifth Year of the 
Great War." Despite the Christmas rush 
at the time, the program was well attended 
and received favorable comment from 
friends of the school. 

Social life held a place in the activity of 
the group as well. A Christmas banquet 
was held in a Quincy restaurant, and many 
of the semi-monthly meetings were con- 



cluded by refreshments, served by one of 
the society's most enthusiastic boosters, 
Mrs. L. A. Marquart. 

Despite a sudden change of Leadership 
at the beginning of the year, the society 
has had efficient and active executives. 
C. Weston Jones guided the activities in 
his role as president, and has given the 
society a collection of old documents and 
coins. 

The members will miss the enthusiastic 
support of Professor Marquart, but the 
wholesome fellowship an I profitable ac- 
tivity of the society is expected to con- 
tinue next year under the new head of the 
Department of History. 



President 

I 'ice- President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 
Ad riser 



C. Weston Jones 

Howard Andree 

Beulah Marvin 

Elmer ( 'ox 

Professor Marquart 



o 




£ /-N *k *l- 



f ft 1.1- r 



tt, Priestley, Cox. Marquart, W. Jones, Indree, B. Marvin, Hilla 
Akets, Wise, I. Payne, T. Marvin, F, Smith, Foster, Peffer, l< ei <n, Lehman, Parsons, Srotl 



' 



53 



League of Evangelical Students 




Among the most active of all E. X. C. 
societies, the League of Evangelical Stu- 
dent >, chapter of the national League, is 
an efficiently organized group of about 
fifty-five students interested in Christian 
work. 

Carrying out its purpose of lilting high 
the torch of salvation, the L. E. S. has this 
year continued conducting regular and 
special services at missions and churches 
in Boston and near-by communities. In 
1939 it made contact with a new mission, 
Emmanuel Gospel Center, at which several 
services are being held each month. 

Another fruitful activity is the singing 
of inspirational hymns by an informal 



mixed chorus at the Quinev City Hospital 
each Sunday afternoon. Letters of appre- 
ciation and spoken reports indicate that 
not only the patients hut also nurses ami 
hospital officials look forward to the >tu- 
dents' visits. 

In all its activities, including a jail ser- 
vice, street meetings, and the Mgnifieant 
weekly prayer meetings held especially 
for members, the League is a potent force 
in demonstrating the love and the power 
of .Ions ( hri>t. 



President 

I 'ice-President 

Sec rcfitr// 
Treasurer 



Wesley Brown 

Warren Minglcdortf 

Muriel Payne 

Oscar Stockwell 



>i 



Student Ministerial Association 



The Student Ministerial Association of 
Eastern Xazarene College was inaugu- 
rated in December of 1938. Since that 
time it has grown both in numbers and in 
scope of service. 

As an organization it represents one of 
the largest and certainly one of the most 
important departments of the college. The 
association is proud to have as its sponsor 
Dr. S. S. White. Dean of Theology, and 
pastor of the College Church. 

In the bi-monthly meetings papers were 
read by the members on various themes 
appropriate for ministers. At one meeting 
Rev. William Nichols, pastor of the United 
Presbyterian Church of Qnincy, addressed 
the organization on "The Duties of a 
Pastor"; at another, Mrs. G. B. William- 
son spoke on "The Importance of Good 
Speech." 



The annual program was given February 
l(i. Rev. V. II. Sawyer of the Wollaston 
M. E. Church spoke on "Lincoln, the Man 
of the Ages." Ivan Beckwith played 
special organ selections. 

It is the purpose of the S. M. A. t > 
acquaint its members with the practical 
side of the gospel ministry. In a very 
real sense the Christian minister has but 
one function; that is to help Cod save the 
world. This one function, however, in- 
volves a diversity of operations. The good 
minister, therefore, must have more than 
the ability to preach; he should be able to 
deal with the problems of men and to 
handle wisely the program of the church. 
President William Allshouse 

Secretary-Treasurer Lawrence Walker 
Program Head Earl Lee 

Adviser Professor White 




./. Niehon, Mills, Walker, Allshouse, 117,,/../.,.. Dixon, Gordon 

II. Brown, F. Brickley, Downing, (.. Brickley, /■'. Smith, Hetrick, /',.//„„. /,'. Shoff, l„„n,. Mingledorjf, Kano 



55 



A < ;i|»|H'll;i Choir 



iVf i « i M> 



fi 



a 



i 



Gardner, Sw igert, A/. Kinney, Hitler, WiUiamsoji, B. S \ Maddox, Gould 

Yost, D. Brickley, Blauvelt, Friend, IK Pearsall,Graffam, Persons, Priestly, Salvia, Calhoun 
Dickerson, l luart, Mingledorff, Restricts, K, Pear sail, Powell, Foster, Slump/, Pliskelt, Hanks 

MRS. ESTHER WILLIAMSON. Director 



.Mom's Chorus 




on, Stemm, Slralhern, II . 
J Vielson, R. Vielsem, P. Kirkland, Day 
Hanks, Slump/, Fisk, I 

\ l SY STE MM, Di'i 



56 



Orchestra 




I. Nielaon, B. Kaufman, D. Jones, Berberian, Shirton, Kilgour, Scherneck, Kilgour, Foster, Visscker, Gould, J. Nielson 
E. Bowen, B. Bowen, Siherbrand, Richardson, Tillotson, ft. Wood, Williamson, II. Nielson, Coburn, Eby, Edwards, D. Brickley, Sweigen 
Rankin, Yosl 

MRS. G. B. WILLIAMSON, Director 




Kallgren, R. \ ielson, Shirton, Scherneck, Shoemaker, Eby, Sweigert, Plaskett, Edit ard 
Bansmere, Timm, Heffern.Cole, Peffer, l'<<\/ 
Wingledorff, Ladd, 1-. ster, D. Brickley, Hank 

ARLINGTON VISSCHER, Directoi 



57 



Sigma Delta Alpha 




Alpha President speaking, "that spark- 
ling, scintillating, scarlet-haired son of the 
South smiling Grondall Foster": 

"Loyalty to School, Society, Self, — S's 
spell school spirit. 

"School first. At first we said 'They' 
when we Spoke of E. X. C Xow we say 
We.' 

"Society next. The Sigma Delta so- 
cieties Stand for the finest things of college 
life. 

"Self too for in helping School and 

Society we grow ourselves." 

* * * * 

Tliis kind of School Spirit is Alpha 
spirit. 

Alphas finished last year on top. 

Alphas met bewildered freshmen on 
Registration Day with an Information 
desk in l lie lobby and a hearty welcome. 

Alphas welcomed new members on Hush 



Day with the Alpha purple and white 
booth, the Alpha purple and white badge, 
and the compelling Alpha broadcasts. 

Alphas made a sensation program night 
with Longfellow's Hiawatha in music and 
poetry. 

Alphas enlivened the monotony of winter 
with an educational travel "talkie." They 
Discovered America. 

Alphas still lead the way with Alpha 
pins and campaign spirit . 

President Grondall Foster 

Vice-President William Benson 

Secretary Helen Strait 

Treasurer Ahbic-.Jcan Kautl'nian 

Coach Rudy Anderson 

Stephen Find 
Program. Chairman Lillian Kendall 
Chaplain Tondra Border 

. Idriser Professor Reeves 



58 



Sigma Delta Beta 



From "that marvelous, magnanimous, 
matrimonial-minded man from Maine, 
Lloyd Gordon," President of the Betas, 
we hear: 

"This is election year, leap year, census 
year, war year, and Beta year. 

"The contribution E. X. C. makes to a 
student's life is tremendous. E. X. C. 
under God has discovered and developed 
abilities we never knew existed within us. 
Every Beta will try to repay her by 
bringing in other students to share her 
blessings." 



Smallest of the societies last September, 
Beta has forged to the front. 

Beta was far in the lead both semester 
Hush Days in gaining new names. 

Betas welcomed new members by a 
mouth-watering Squantum breakfast. 

Betas celebrated Armistice Day with 



the most original and appropriate pro- 
gram — on Peace. 

Betas more than "held their own" in 
sports. They won five out of nine basket- 
ball games, and missed the championship 
by one last-second basket. 

Betas won the Student-Get-Student 
trophy last fall. That trophy represents 
our best — and it is only a beginning. 

Beta spells Cooperation, Unity. 



President 
Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Chaplain 

Coach 

Program Chairmen 



Adviser 



Lloyd Gordon 

Roland Stanford 

Ruth Kinsey 

Muriel Payne 

Betty Kauft'man 

Wesley Brown 

Lee Powell 

Jean Shrader 

Evangeline Garrison 

Edith Fader 

Professor Babcock 




59 



Sigma Delta Gamma 




"Willing, winsome, 'Why don't you 
speak for yourself, John' Xielsou," Presi- 
dent of Gammas, says: 

"Loyalty and Sigma Delta Gamma are 
synonymous. 

"Out of loyalty to a cause spring Hard 
Work, Good Sportsmanship, Success, 
and the noblest type of society life. 

"Over and over the Gamma spirit lias 

won." 

* * * * 

Gammas last year were "tops." 
Champions in baseball. First in E. N. 

('. dime contest. Winners (with Betas) 

in track. 

Gammas this year are champions in 

football and basketball. Cooperation did 

it; cheers sent that famous last ball into 



the basket from the other end of the 
floor. 

Gammas first in Debt Reduction Cam- 
paign pledge. 

Gammas won congratulations for their 
striking program. "Negro Life of the South." 

The enthusiasm and good spirit of the 
past will carry on in the future. Gammas 
will win! 



President 
Vice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 

< 'oach 

Program < 'hairman 

. Idviser 



.John Nielson 

George Marple 

Anna Mary Shoff 

Betty Zimmerman 

( reorge Brickley 

Earl llcinlein 

Robert Shoff 

Paul Peffer 

Professor White 



60 



Green Book 



We <li<l not choose the theme "Houses" 
for our 1940 Green Hook because the Fresh- 
men were homesick, hut because we have 
tried to present our day in a slightly differ- 
ent manner by taking our readers through 
a world of houses, and by filling the 
theme section with unusual and interesting 
compositions. 

The 1U40 Green Hook has omitted no 
phase of our college day: our church-house, 
the chapel; our school-house, the Ad 
Building; our recreation-house, the gym- 
nasium; our book-house, the library; our 
bunk-houses, the dorms; our fun-house, 
the Dugout; and our mess-house, the 
dining hall. 

Our day is as typical to us as Mrs. 
Roosevelt's is to her. We are as busy as a 
subway turnstile at the 5:30 rush hour. 
We enjoy our school-work and our campus 
play. We enjoy it so much that we have 
filled a book describing it to others. 

The members of the editorial staff and 



the Freshman (lass have individualized 
this newest edition of the Green Hook with 
special features, one of which is ;i seel ion 
devoted to book reviews. We have tried 
to make it a vivid example of student life. 
and a memorial to the Class of 1940. 



Editor 

Assistant Editor 
Literary Editors 

Snapshot Editor 
College Life Editor: 



Sports Editor 
. 1 rt Editor 
Proof reader 
Typists 



Business Managers 



Lyal Calhoun 
Virginia Graffam 

Roland Stanford 

Helen Marvin 

Raul Kirkland 

Goldie Mills 

Beulah Marl in 

Xick Yost 

( ieorge Rice 

Bert Greer 

Ruth Boyd 

Theodore Georgian 

Anne Lyle 

Winifred Maddox 

Paul Eby 

Carl Hanks 

Tondra Border 









alhoun, Graff am, H. Marvin 
Georgian, Rice, Yosl, Maddox, C. White, Lyle, P. Kirkland, B. Martin 



61 



Campus Camera 



t\\.CII YEAR the Campus Camera has 
improved in content and makeup. This 
year several features have been changed 
and the Dumber of cuts and illustrations 
lias been increased. "Professor DuBlowy" 
provides a satirical touch. "Meet the 
Prof" better acquaints us with our teachers, 
and "Views on the News - ' by Professor 
Marquart keeps us in touch with world 
a Hairs. 

The Camera has become an integral part 
of our school life. Several times in the past 
year the Camera has "scooped" the news of 
the week by an announcement of a new 
faculty appointment or new voting regu- 
lations. 

With the friendly criticism of Professor 
Spangenberg, the staff has presented to us 
a well written, interesting, and up-to-date 
college newspaper. The editors are to he 
congratulated on the < a mini's quick growth 
in the last four years. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief 
. [ssociate Editor 
News Editor 
Literary Editor 
Columnist 
Reporters 



Sports Editor 
Sports Writers 

Artist 
Secretary 
. Uumni Editor 
Faculty . Id riser 



Charles W. Akers 

Muriel Payne 

Harold Parsons 

Elizabeth Zimmerman 

Anne Lyle 

Lillian Kendall 

Lyal Calhoun 

Jean Shrader 

James Lehman 

Carl Hanks 

Bert Greer 

Franklvn Wise 

Elizabeth Corbett 

Donald Tillotson 

Professor Spangenberg 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager Paul E. Peffer 

Assistant Business Manager Earl Heinlein 
Secretary Lawrence Walker 



; Semester; 
Edilor-in-i 
Business Managei 



I ./mi;. ] 
/•';i>/». U 



Paul I . Pi 




<._> 



Kick-off (inter jump first pitch sen ice. 



Eager spectators. Game time. Whistle. 



Lessons in self- master//. Balance. 



Flashing action. Cool decision. 



Crafty attack tight defense. 



Co-ordination anil grace. 



( ,i in rons sportsmen. 





RTS 



X 4 lllll 




Andrei 

■ ■ man 



The "N" Club lias now been active for 
just one year. It was organized at the 
athletic banquet last May. 1!):?'). 

The purpose of the "N" Club is to work 
in an advisory capacity with the athletic 
coach and the faculty athletic committee, 
in directing and promoting athletics at 
K. N. ('. The club during this past year 
has played an important role in tin- ath- 
letic program. 

Every year ten new members arc elected 
to the club. They are given membership 
in the "N" Club by a majority vote of 
all young men who have participated in 
inter-society athletics. The candidates for 
the club are nominated by the athletic 
coach and the athletic committee. When 
a student gains membership in the "N" 
<lul». this honor continues throughout his 
career a I E. X. C. 



The qualifications for membership in the 
"N" Clul» are first. Sportmanship; second, 
Team I alue, or the worth of the player to 
the team: and third. Individual Excellence. 

When a student becomes a member of 

this club he is awarded a six-inch letter 
"N." The members are the only persons 
who are permitted to wear the athletic 
letter. To receive this letter is a worth- 
while honor because it means that the 
athlete has been recognized by his fellow 
team-mates and opponents as an all-round 
fellow and a good sport. 

The charter members of the "N" (lul) 
are Robert Shoff, Karl Lee, Karl Scott. 
Lee Powell', -lames Lehman, Elmer Cox, 
•lames Shaw. Karl Wolf. Clair Dornon, 
and Howard Andree. 



66 



Society Coaches 




Lind Alpha ShoJ) -Gamma Powell Beta 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR Bob Sho£ 



Touch Foothall Champs — Camillas 




Heinlein, Hanks, Shoff, Peffer.G. Brickley 
Pm I • , Payne, J. Vielson, Yost 

67 



Alpha Basketball 




Foster, Lind, Lee 

Blaughtr, Young, Howard, Lehman 



Beta Basketball -- 1940 runners up 




I ox, '••■ ■:/. PtarsaU 

\i i,h. ( ootnbs, l.iiunt-. ./. Smith 

iirfimt • l . <» - no) appeal in picture 



68 



Gaiiiiua Basketball — 1940 champs 




G. Brickley, Shoff, Heinlein, 
K. Neilson, Yost, Parry 



Hunks, J. Nielson 



Girls 9 Allstar Team 




A. M. Shojj 

(.'. Mills, Garrison, Friend, Tripp, Culm- 



<,') 



7 




Nautilus Staff 



Editor-in-Chief 
. [ssistani Editor 
Literary Editor 
Assistant Literary Editors 

Photography Editor 
Assistant Photography Editors 

Sports Editor 
Art Consultant 
Typist for Literary Staff 
Managing Editor 
Business Manager 
Ad Staff 

Typist for Business Staff' 

Literary Staff Adviser 
Business Staff Adviser 



Madeline Hiller 

Hazel Cru tcher 

Lillian Kendall 

Rachel Emery 

Jean Shrader 

William Restrick 

William Cole 

Betty Kaurrman 

Kenneth Pearsall 

Douglas Fisk 

Mildred Seherneek 

Earl Lee 

George Laurie 

Gaynelle Persons 

Arpod Artwohl 

Ruth Adsit 

Professor Bertha Munro 

Professor Henry Reeves 



72 



ADVERTISING 




SUNDAY 

Sunday School 
Morning Worship . 
V V. P. S. . 
Evangelistic Service 

WEDNESDAY 
Prayer and Praise 



9.30 a.m. 

10.45 a.m. 

6.30 p.m. 

7.30 p.m. 



7.30 p.m. 



Church 

of the 

Nazarene 

Spiritual 

Jfunbamental 
Cbangelistic 



466 MAIN STREET 
MANCHESTER, CONN. 



E. (i. LUSK, Minister 

466 Main Street Phone 5259 



AnE. N. C. Booster" 



Church of the Nazarene 



Rev. R. A. Dobie 

75 SPRUCE STREET 
i( lorner Smith I 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 



SUNDAY 

10.00a.m. Church School 
11.00 a.m. Morning Worship 

7.00 p.m. Evangelistic Service 



TUESDAY 

7.30 p.m. N. V. 1'. S. 

THURSDAY 
7.30 p.m. Mid-Week Prayer Service 



New England's Largest 

Church Supply House 

THE CARROLL E. WHITTEMORE ASSOCIATES, INC. 
16 ASHBURTON PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone: CAPitol 6866 

FOR MINISTERS AND THEOLOGICAL STUDENTS 

Visit Our 25c Section of Over 2000 Religious Books 

On personal books 15', cash, 10', if charged. 
Textbooks 10', cash, 5', if charged. 

Send for a free complete Church Supply Catalogue 



Compliments of 



A Friend 



Compliments of 

Geo. L. MacKinnon, M. D. 

7 WEST ELM AVENUE 
WOLLASTON, MASS. 



Stop at TALBOT-QUINCY . . . 
// will pay you to sec the 

best rallies in Quincy 

Men's and Young Men's Suits 

Talbot-Quincy Co. 

1387 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY, MASS. 

( 'ompliments of 

Edwin H. Storer 

New York Life Insurance Co. 

75 FEDERAL STREET 
BOSTON. MASS. 

Tel. Ill I! 1900 

COMPLIMENTS 

of 

Newcomb Baking 
Company 



When in Need of . . . 

Hardware Packard Paints 

Kitchenware Radio Tubes 

Wall Paper 

Call GRAnite 0041 

J. MacFarland & Sons 

9 Brook Street Wollaston, Mass. 

"Say 1 1 Willi Flowers" 

Patterson Flower Stores 

ELSIE M. PATTERSON 
Florist and Decorator 

N8.'3 HANCOCK STREET 
GRAnite 0S8S 

C. Y. Woodbury, Inc. 

676 HANCOCK STREET 
WOLLASTON, MASS. 



General Repairing 
Oil Burners 



Motor Tune-Up 
Fuel Oils 



Service is not our motto 

it's our busiru ss 
Telephone PRES 5512. 5513 



C o m p 1 i m e n t s of 



H. P. Hood & Sons 



INC 



Milk and Ice Cream 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 




First Church of the 
Nazarene 

907 Pennsylvania Ave., East 

WARREN, PENNA. 

REV. II. BLAIR WARD. Minister 
Class of '29 

"tiSTS^J."' ' M .'* jgJLj ""■ ' ■ '""■ '>'""'' .V'». <>. /./'"( W'urr, ii, S/iiji mi, I Worxhiji 

with I '.«. 



Jfirst Cfturct) 

of tfte 

j?a>arene 

Hayden Ave. at Claiborne Road 
EAST CLEVELAND, OHIO 

REV. J. GLENN GOULD, M.A., Minister 
KENNETH L. AKINS, Director of Music 



Compliments of 

Church of the 
Nazarene 

BELLAIRE OHIO 

JAMES II. .JONES. Pastor 



8 TAFT AVENUE 



William $. 233alfeer 

Minister 

First Church of the 
Nazarene 



WINTER ST. 
Haverhill, Mass. 



I'llnllC ()01 1 



Church of the Nazarene, Dover, N. J. 
Hudson Street 
REGULAR SERVICES 



SUNDAY 
Ctanircfa School 

WOrship 

Young People's Meeting 
Evangelistic 


<).45 a.m. 
11.00 a.m. 
7.00 p.m. 

7.45 p.m. 

2.00 p.m. 
7.00 p.m. 


THURSDAY 
Mid-Week Prayer 


7.45 p.m. 


s\ 1 I kl>\N 
Junior Society 
Mrn's Prayer Hour 




1 1 ESDA1 

Women's Prayer Meeting 
Ili-Y Meeting 


2.00 p.m. 
B 00 p.m. 


£eb. Tfohn 3D. ILunbcn. pastor 


3 Myrtle Ave. Dover, 


Now .Jersey 



YOU ARE WELCOME 
At the 

Quincy Y.M.C.A. 

Special Hates to Students 

Church of the Nazarene 

The Church Where You Are Never 
A Stranger 

52 WESTMINSTER STREET 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

See our church sign on State St., one mile 

from the center, Route No. 20. Friends 

travelling between Boston and Xevv York, 

visit us. 

R. J. Kirkland, Pastor 

First Church of the 
Nazarene 

1090 Congress Street 
PORTLAND MAINE 

"When in Portland visit our church where you 
are always welcome." 

Sundays 10.30 a.m.-7.80 p.m. 
Wednesday 7.30 p.m. 

GEORGE D. RILEY, Pastor 



Church of the Nazarene 

WEST SOMERVILLE, MASS. 

RUSSELL AND ELM ST. 



REV. EVERETT PHILLIPS, Pastor 



Church of the Nazarene 

EAST LIVERPOOL, OHIO 
Rev. Charles C. Hanks, Minister 

407 VINE STREET 



Services 




Sunday School 


9.30 


Morning Worship 


11.00 


N. Y. P. S. 


6.30 


Evangelistic Service 


7.30 


Prayer Service Wednesday 


7.30 



C O M P LIME X T S OF 



A Friend 



Com pi intents of 

William D. Michael, M.D. 

Optometrist 

1581 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 

HANCOCK 
PAINTS 



vol are always 

WELCOME AT THE 

First Church 

of the 

Nazarene 

JUDSON SQUARE 

AT FERRY STREET 

MALDEN, MASS. 




REV. MILTON SMITH 
Pastor 



HAROLD HARDING 

Sunday School Superintendent 



ELIZABETH YOUNG 
N. V. P. S. President 



Church of the Nazarene 



First Street Near Bridge 
LOWELL, MASS. 



S E R V 1 C E S 




Sunday School ..... 


9..*o a.m 


Worship Service ..... 


10. .10 a.m 


N. V. P. S. . . . 


5.30 p.m 


Evangelistic Service .... 


6.30 p.m 


\I id-Week Service Thursday . 


7.30 p.m 



REV. JOHN N1KLSON, Minister 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



First Church of the Nazarene 

STEPHEN S. WHITE, Pastor 

EASTERN NAZARENE COLLEGE 

W o 1 1 a s t o n, Mass. 



Church School 
Morning Worship 
N. Y. P. S. 
Evangelistic Service 
Prayer Meeting Wednesday 

A. .1. KARKER, Secretary 
323 Farrington Street 

MRS. (i. B. WILLIAMSON, Sunday School Superintendent 



S E R V I C E S 






9.45 a.m. 




11.00 a.m. 




6.30 p.m. 




7.30 p.m. 




7.45 p.m. 




E. S. MANN, Treasurer 




(il East Elm Avenue 



We are happy in our work as we minister to the spiritual needs of the 
students of Eastern Nazarene College and the citizens of Wollaston. 



Machines Sold On 
Budget Plan 

Quincy Typewriter 
Service 

TYPEWRITERS, ADDING MACHINES* 
SUPPLIES 

SOLD RENTED REPAIRED 

9A MAPLE STREET QUINCY, MASS. 

Granite 3656 



GRAnite 

.".lis 



For Better 
II ' orkmanship 



Rite-Way 



CLEANSERS TAILORS FURRIERS 
Dyeing, Pressing, and Alterations 

Work Called for and Delivered 
Wollastoii Store 371 BILLINGS ROAD 

Congratulations 

C L A S S O F • 40 
from 

Remick's 



( Dm fill mints oj 

W. H. Beard, D.M.D. 

1011 BEACON STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 

1,1, phone BE Vcon L563 



Quint's Greenhouses 



The Beauty of Our Business Is Flowers 



1258 Hancock Street Quincy, Mass. 



I. in , ii us linrn i ii a 

garden oj flowers 



at Quincy Square 



Tel. LIBerty 8760 

I lour-: !» a.m. to 4. .'id p.m. 



I:i/i s Exa in i in il 
I'n scriptions Fillt •! 



Harold J. Sparling, O. D. 
OPTOMETRIST 



GEO. E. HOMER 
Opt. Depi. 

41 Winter Street 



Boston, Mass. 



GRAnite- 2124 



lubrication 



Stephen F. Yule 
CITIES SERVICE PRODUCTS 

Tires and Batteries 

Opp. Xi a' Supri an Bali i 



WOLLASTON 



MASS. 



Milton Springs Beverages 
Made in the BlueHills oj Milton 



Manufactured by 

Charles C. Copeland Co. 

MILTON, MASS. 



Winn Studio 

i:t2 Boylston Street 

Boston 






Richard G. Mahoney, Photographer for 1939-40 




EASTERN NAZARENE COLLEGE 

Wholesome Spiritual Atmosphere 
High Scholastic Standards 
Cultural Environment 
Moderate Expense 

Opportunity for Employment 

Registration Day -- September 17, 1940 

/•Or Catalog and Oilier Information Write 
(;. IS. WILLIAMSON, I). I)., President 



WOLLASTON PARK 
01 INC Y, MASS. 



£ 



VKCCCSS 



To assure the success of your 
year book employ the services of 
a printing firm equipped with the 
latest type faces, versed in the 
latest style developments and 
known for exacting standards 
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. . . Eight Colleges, 
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after year, by entrusting us with 
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PRINTERS OF THIS BOOK 



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■